Maria Pinińska-Bereś

– born 1931 in Poznań, died 1999 in Krakow – sculptor, author of performances, objects and installations. Between 1950 and 1956 she studied at the Faculty of Sculpture of the Academy of Fine Arts in Kracow in Xawery Dunikowski’s studio. The artist’s work is often referred to as feminist, although she herself distanced herself from feminism, not denying that the main theme of her work is the figure of a woman. The deconstruction of the leaning tower, though dating from a late period in her career, is part of a trend initiated by the artist in the early 1970s when she began to abandon classical sculptural materials in favor of softer and lighter ones – she used plywood, papier-mâché, and above all fabric (sewn, quilted, embroidered); pink became her trademark.

 “I do not adhere to any sculptural discipline, I do not refer to any style. (…) I have my own intimate little world”1.

“Art was a refuge for me in the face of experiences: familial, national, and those related to issues of my gender – punctuated by a traditional, hermetic upbringing”2.

“Form was and remains paramount. It was important to reach for the feminine way of forming the work. From sewn, stuffed, modeled fabric. A soft sculpture is created. Painted pink. And a pink banner – the banner of femininity, so far disdained. And all this after perfect studies under X. Dunikowski. Dunikowski. How strong was the determination. Today my art has an existential dimension. It is through my art that I have become freer and stronger. I have liberated myself”3!

“In many actions the elements of nature were the building blocks of the action, e.g. the force of the wind; the stones which I marked with my pink; the snow – an essential element for the action The Banner; the rose bush which was planted in Living Pink. But I have always considered this sphere of experience very intimate and maybe that is why I did not use it fully. Sex was not – as I see it today – an equally intimate sphere, because it was shared as with another human being, because it appeared in my experience also as a social factor”4.

“I think I hadn’t done anything that could be called „feminine art.” Until the year 1960. It is since that year that certain elements characteristic of that kind of attitude have appeared in my work. (…) However, in 1965 I decided to give up the sculptor’s materials and techniques. The decision was all the more heroic being that I had been a clever student of sculpting, praised by the master – Prof. Xawery Dunikowski. My later work hadn’t given me any reasons to feel disappointed either. Still, it was the time when I felt I needed to create what was genuine and stemming directly from the artists’s personality. The Rotundas were still to some extent part of the cultural continuum of the traditional sculpture. Now the time had come for a wholesale liberation of the artist’s personality. And the artist in that case happened to be a woman with a whole lot of experience that I would refer to now as “feminine”. I hadn’t yet heard of feminism then and I tended to conceal my experiences., observations and grievances. But once I stared to speak for myself and released my feminine resources, suddenly a river welled up that even I myself find sometimes embarrassing. Then it’s hard for me to face the audiences at exhibitions with their aggressive or mocking comments. For a number of years my exhibits were destroyed by anonymous visitors. So the area of contents… I thought, however, that for art to fully feminine it was not enough to reach for the eternally feminine techniques. My sculptures were sewn by hand, stuffed, moulded and colored. For a while I used the technique of successive layers of paper on top of one another. I fulfilled at least one requirement: I could carry my sculptures by myself. Before, when I used cast metal, I had always depended on men to help me transport my pieces. So I invented my own feminine technique and started to speak for myself and express myself. In 1965 I thought I was leaping in the void. The leap was risky as I was leaving behind all my previously acquired skills and technical know-how. Yet the call of authenticity prevailed and I began to fill the void”5.

„It was in the late seventies that I first heard my art. Being referred to as feminine. Did I find it important? I was astonished. On the one hand it raised hopes that I would find some souls akin to mine, but on the other hand, it brought a number of artistic disappointments for the instrumentalist approach to art by European feminists, as in the case of the Internationale Feminisische Kunst exhibition in the Hague. For the last decade I have been conducting a dialogue or, should I say, playing a kind of a game with art, Whatever I have managed to express about my sex and whatever emotional experiences I have gone through while wrestling with the taboo and the anti-women commandments, I have remained convinced of the superiority of art”.6

“Even as an 11 or 12 year old child, however, I felt something like humiliation and disappointment at being a ‘woman’. My brothers had more personal freedom than I did, and there was hope in them. I saw my biology and what it entailed as a curse. In those days, all the stereotypes and superstitions about the role of women were strongly operative. The family was patriarchal, with a strong dominance of the earning male. Also not to be underestimated was the role of the church. During my adolescence and later when I entered adult life, I “collected” situations, behaviors, customs and slogans that I considered harmful and humiliating for women (…) Sometimes I was embarrassed by my own work. There was a certain excess of norms in them”7.

Example of the Artist’s work from the collection of Zachęta: De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II, 199589101112.

Materials collated by Ewa Mielczarek (2020).

Ewa Mielczarek – born 1992. Curator, culture expert, creator of interdisciplinary projects. A graduate of cultural studies at the Institute of Polish Culture of the University of Warsaw and History of Art at the Polish Academy of Sciences. In 2016-2018, she worked at the Propaganda Gallery in Warsaw and was the coordinator of the Warsaw Gallery Weekend. Since 2018, an employee of Zachęta – National Gallery of Art and producer of exhibitions at the Polish Pavilion at the Biennale in Venice. Since 2015, she has been running the The Hidden Photo project and the Rozmowwa platform. Curator and producer at RATS Agency.
1Art Criticism and Information Section of Polish Journalists' Association, Third Exhibition of the Laureates of Art Criticism Awards, 1974, Krakow.
2Maria Pinińska-Bereś, catalog of the exhibition Polish Women Artists, 1991, National Museum, Warsaw.
3Maria Pinińska-Bereś, from a letter to a critic, 1993, “Maria Pinińska-Bereś 1931-1999”, p 30.
4Maria Pinińska-Bereś, Nature and M., 1994, “Maria Pinińska-Bereś 1931-1999”, p 32.
5Maria Pinińska-Bereś, Kobieta o kobiecie [Woman About Woman], Galeria Bielska BWA, 25 July 1995.
6Maria Pinińska-Bereś, Kobieta o kobiecie [Woman About Woman], Galeria Bielska BWA, 25 July 1995, transl. Bogusław Bierwiaczonek.
7Maria Pinińska-Bereś, Catalogue of Studio Gallery, 1997, Warsaw.
8Image: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II [De-con-struction of a leaning tower II], 1995, coll. Zachęta – National Gallery, Warsaw. Courtesy of Zachęta – National Gallery.
9Image: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II [De-con-struction of a leaning tower II], 1995, coll. Zachęta – National Gallery, Warsaw. Courtesy of Zachęta – National Gallery.
10Image: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II [De-con-struction of a leaning tower II], 1995, coll. Zachęta – National Gallery, Warsaw. Courtesy of Zachęta – National Gallery.
11Image: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II [De-con-struction of a leaning tower II], 1995, coll. Zachęta – National Gallery, Warsaw. Courtesy of Zachęta – National Gallery.
12Image: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II [De-con-struction of a leaning tower II], 1995, coll. Zachęta – National Gallery, Warsaw. Courtesy of Zachęta – National Gallery.

– urodzona w 1931, Poznań, zmarła w 1999, Kraków – rzeźbiarka, autorka performansów, obiektów i instalacji. W latach 1950–1956 studiowała na Wydziale Rzeźby Akademii Sztuk Pięknych w Krakowie w pracowni Xawerego Dunikowskiego. Twórczość artystki często określana jest jako feministyczna, choć ona sama dystansowała się wobec feminizmu, nie zaprzeczając, że głównym tematem jej twórczości jest figura kobiety. Dekonstrukcja krzywej wieży, choć pochodzi z późnego okresu twórczości, wpisuje się w nurt zapoczątkowany przez artystkę na początku lat 70. Zaczęła wówczas odchodzić od klasycznych rzeźbiarskich materiałów na rzecz bardziej lekkich i miękkich — stosowała sklejkę, papier-mâché, a przede wszystkim tkaniny (szyte, pikowane, haftowane); jej znakiem rozpoznawczym stał się kolor różowy.

 „Programowo nie trzymam się dyscypliny rzeźbiarskiej, nie nawiązuję też do żadnego stylu, używam środków, które w danym momencie są mi potrzebne. (…) Ja mam swój własny intymny, mały świat”1.

„Sztuka była dla mnie azylem wobec przeżyć: rodzinnych, narodowych i związanych z problemami mojej płci – wypunktowanych przez tradycyjne, hermetyczne wychowanie”2.

„Forma była w pozostaje najważniejszą. Istotnym było sięgnięcie do kobiecego sposobu formowania dzieła. Z tkaniny szytej, wypychanej, modelowanej. Powstaje miękka rzeźba. Malowana na różowo. I różowy sztandar – sztandar kobiecości, tej dotąd pogardzanej. I to wszystko po perfekcyjnych studiach u X. Dunikowskiego. Jak silna była determinacja. Dzisiaj moja sztuka ma wymiar egzystencjalny. To poprzez moją sztukę stałam się wolniejsza i silniejsza. Wyzwoliłam siebie”3!

„W wielu akcjach elementy przyrody były budulcami akcji np. siła wiatru; kamienie które znaczyłam swoim różem; śnieg- element niezbędny przy akcji Transparent; krzak róży który został posadzony w Żywym różu. Zawsze jednak uważałam tę sferę przeżyć za bardzo intymną i może dlatego nie wykorzystałam jej w pełni. Seks nie był – jak widzę to dzisiaj – sferą równie intymną, bo dzielony był jak z drugim człwoekiem, bo zaistniał w moim doświadzceniu również jako czynnik społeczny”4.

„Rok 1960 uważam za datę, kiedy zaczyna się moja sztuka, którą można określić jako kobiecą. Właściwie od roku 1960 występowały w robionych przeze mnie pracach pewne elementy takiej postawy. (…) W 1965 roku postanowiłam jednak całkowicie zerwać z rzeźbiarskim materiałem I warsztatem. Decyzja ta była bardziej heroiczna, że podczas studiów byłam zdolną studentką rzeźby chwaloną przez mistrza, prof. Xawerego Dunikowskiego. Także późniejsze prace nie dawały mi powodów do rozczarowań artystycznych. Czułam jednak w tych latach potrzebę tworzenia sztuki autentycznej i wyrosłej z osobowości autora. Rotundy były jeszcze w pewnym sensie wpisane w ciąg kulturowy rzeźby warsztatowej. Teraz chodziło o wyzwolenie osobowości autora. A autorem była w tym wypadku kobieta, z bagażem doświadczeń, które dziś bym określiła jako feministyczne. O feminizmie jeszcze nie słyszałam, a swoje doświadczenia, spostrzeżenia i urazy głęboko skrywałam. Lecz gdy postanowiłam mówić własnym głosem, gdy odblokowałam ten kobiecy rezerwuar, to wypłynęła rzeka, która mnie samą czasem wprawiała w zakłopotanie. Bardzo wtedy przeżywałam wtedy otwarcia wystaw i uwagi, często agresywne i kpiące. Przez szereg lat moje prace były na wystawach niszczone przez anonimowe osoby. A więc strefa treści… Uważałam jednak, że to jeszcze mało, że sztuka, aby była w pełni kobieca powinna sięgać do odwiecznie kobiecych technik. Moje rzeźby były ręcznie szyte, wypychane, modelowane i pokrywane kolorem. Przez pewnie czas stosowałam technikę klejonych warstw papierowych. Spełniłam postulat, abym sama mogła swoje rzeźby nosić. Przy wcześniejszych pracach odlewanych, musiałam przy transportach zawsze liczyć na męską pomoc. W 1965 uważałam, że dokonuję skoku w próżnię. Skoku ryzykownego, przekreślającego zdobyte umiejętności i warsztat. Jednak postulat autentyzmu przeważył i zaczęłam tę próżnię wypełniać”5.

„W drugiej połowie lat siedemdziesiątych, a więc po upływie ponad dziesięciu lat od wkorczenia na tę drogę, usłyszałam określenie mojej sztuki jako feministycznej. Czy to było dla mnie ważne? Było zaskoczeniem. Niosło nadzieję na siostrzane dusze, ale i przyniosło rozczarowanie instrumentalnym podejściem europejskich feminsitek do sztuki, na przykład przy okazji wystawy Internationale Feminisische Kunst w Hadze. W ostatnim dziesięcioleciu prowadziłam dialog czy też swoistą grę ze sztuką. To, co zdołałam o swojej płci wyartykułować, emocjonalne doświadczenia związane z szeregiem tabu i łamaniem przykazań dotyczących kobiety, to wszystko nie zachwiało jednak mojego przekonania o nadrzędności sztuki”.6

“Już jako 11, 12-letnie dziecko czułam jednak coś na kształt upokorzenia i zawiedzenia tym, że jestem „kobietą”. Moi bracia mieli większą wolność osobistą, niż ja, i w nich pokładano nadzieję. Moją biologię i to co z niej wynikało, postrzegałam jako przekleństwo. W tych czasach silnie funkcjonowały wszystkie stereotypy i przesądy dotyczące roli kobiety. Rodzina była patriarchalna, z silną dominacją zarabiającego mężczyzny. Także nie do przecenienia była rola kościoła. W trakcie dorastania i później gdy wkroczyłam w życie dorosłe „kolekcjonowałam” sytuacje, zachowania, obyczaje i slogany, które uważałam za krzywdzące i upokarzające dla kobiet (…) Zdarzało się, że bywałam sama zakłopotana moimi pracami. Było w nich pewne przekroczenie norm”7.

Przykład pracy Artystki znajdujący się w kolekcji Zachęty: De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II, 199589101112.

Materiały zebrała i opracowała Ewa Mielczarek (2020).

Ewa Mielczarek – ur. 1992. Kuratorka, kulturoznawczyni, twórczyni interdyscyplinarnych projektów. Absolwentka kulturoznawstwa w Instytucie Kultury Polskiej UW i historii sztuki w Polskiej Akademii Nauk. W latach 2016-2018 pracowała w warszawskiej galerii Propaganda i była koordynatorką Warsaw Gallery Weekend. Od 2018 pracowniczka Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki i producentka wystaw w Pawilonie Polskim na Biennale w Wenecji. Od 2015 roku prowadzi projekt The Hidden Photo i platformę Rozmowwa. Kuratorka i producentka w RATS Agency.
1Sekcja Krytyki i Informacji Plastycznej Stowarzyszenia Dziennikarzy Polskich, III wystawa laureatów nagród krytyki plastycznej, 1974, Kraków.
2Maria Pinińska-Bereś, katalog wystawy Artystki polskie, 1991, Muzeum Narodowe, Warszawa.
3Maria Pinińska-Bereś, z listu do krytyka, 1993, “Maria Pinińska-Bereś 1931-1999”, s. 30.
4Maria Pinińska-Bereś, Przyroda i M., 1994, “Maria Pinińska-Bereś 1931-1999”, s. 32.
5Maria Pinińska-Bereś, Kobieta o kobiecie, 1995, tłum. Bogusław Bierwiaczonek, Galeria Bielska BWA.
6Maria Pinińska-Bereś, Kobieta o kobiecie, 1995, tłum. Bogusław Bierwiaczonek, Galeria Bielska BWA.
7Maria Pinińska-Bereś, Katalog Galeria Studio, 1997, Warszawa.
8Zdjęcie: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II, 1995, kolekcja Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki, Warszawa. Dzięki uprzjemości Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki.
9Zdjęcie: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II, 1995, kolekcja Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki, Warszawa. Dzięki uprzjemości Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki.
10Zdjęcie: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II, 1995, kolekcja Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki, Warszawa. Dzięki uprzjemości Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki.
11Zdjęcie: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II, 1995, kolekcja Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki, Warszawa. Dzięki uprzjemości Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki.
12Zdjęcie: Maria Pinińska-Bereś, De-kon-strukcja krzywiej wieży II, 1995, kolekcja Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki, Warszawa. Dzięki uprzjemości Zachęty – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki.